INSTITUT GIACOMETTI

Go to the Montparnasse district, where Alberto Giacometti (1901-1966) lived and worked in his legendary studio at 46, rue Hippolyte-Maindron from 1926 to 1966. The Giacometti Institute was established nearby, in the wonderful art deco mansion of the artist-decorator Paul Follot (1877-1941).

From the reconstruction of Giacometti’s studio on the ground floor, to Paul Follot’s old preserved studio on the mezzanine floor, which is at the same time minimalist, white and sculptural, where Giacometti sits gently, the Giacometti Institute has been wanted as a museum on a human scale allowing a certain proximity with the works.

It presents permanently an exceptional reconstruction of the studio of Alberto Giacometti, all of whose elements has been preserved by his widow. Among them, plaster and earth works very fragile, some of which have never been shown to the public, his furniture and walls painted by the artist. More than seventy sculptures, mainly in plaster and bronze, including the latest works in earth on which the artist worked just before his death.

INSTITUT GIACOMETTI

5 rue Victor-Schœlcher 75014 Paris

01 44 54 52 44

On Reservation

MUSEE DES ARTS DECORATIFS – MAD

The MAD is a museum which boasts excitingly rich collections as well as temporary exhibitions which reputation is steadily growing. This is a place contemporary creation lovers could definitely consider home. Located in the Marsan wing of the Louvre, its prime mission is the appreciation of fine arts and the development of ties between the industrial world and culture, creation and production. It remains true to its original mission statement which is to maintain the culture of the arts which pursue beauty and usefulness in France.

In 2018, the Musée des Arts Décoratifs became the MAD, which stands for Mode Arts Design (Fashion Arts Design)

It conserves one of the most important fine arts collection in the world in 5 departments with a chronological approach -Medieval era and Renaissance, 17th and 18th centuries, 19th century, Art Nouveau-Art Deco, Modern and Contemporary-  and 7 themed departments – graphic arts, jewellery, toys, wallpapers, glass, fashion and textile, advertising and graphic design- thus taking us on a journey to the evolution of artistic production in fine arts from the Middle-Ages to contemporary design, showing furniture, tableware, graphic arts, goldsmithery, glass, ceramics, wallpaper, tapestry, painting and sculpture.


MAD

107 Rue de Rivoli, 75001 Paris

01 44 55 57 50

MUSEE DU LOUVRE

The former residence of the Kings of France, the Musée du Louvre has become the most visited museum in the world. Over 8 millions people come each year to enjoy the masterpieces.

The great palace hosting the museums dates back to the 12th century and is in itself a true architectural lesson. From 1200 to 2011, some of the most innovative architects helped build and improve the Louvre. The palace was a political center for a long period: a royal residence, and the home of French Chiefs of State until 1870, it was a key place in the history of Paris and France.

A dark fortified fortress built in the 12th century, the Palais du Louvre was the residence of King Francis I then the sumptuous palace of Louis XIV known as the Sun King. A decree from the 6 May 1791 ordered the creation of a Muséum central des arts de la République (Republic’s Central Museum of the Arts). The museum served first and foremost as a place for the training of artists as they were the only ones to have access to le Louvre during the week while the general public could only get in on sundays.

In 1803, the museums was renamed Musée Napoléon and loots from Napoleonic Wars were added to it. Only during the Third Republic did the Louvre become State Property and acquired its current ‘National Museum’ status. During the Presidency of François Mitterrand, the Richelieu wing was given back to the museum as it previously housed the Ministry of Finances. The museum underwent significant revamping under the direction of American architect Ieoh Ming Pei. Its most significant achievement is the building of the Louvre Pyramid at the entrance of the museum.

MUSEE DU LOUVRE

Monday : 9 a.m – 18 p.m
Tuesday : closed
Thursday : 9 a.m – 09.30 p.m
Wednesday : 9 h – 18 h
Friday : 9 a.m – 09.30 p.m
Saturday : 9 h – 18 h
Sunday : 9 h – 18 h

MUSEE RODIN, MUSEES PARIS

MUSEE RODIN

Situated in the Hotel de Biron, the Musée Rodin is also an open-air museum where the public can turn round the sculptures, admire them and touch them. For lovers, the paths of the garden are an ideal place for a walk.

MUSEE RODIN


77 rue de Varenne 75007 Paris
01 44 18 61 10


www.musee-rodin.fr

MUSEE D’ORSAY

 

This museum is dedicated to the 19th century. It presents painting, sculpture, Art Deco, photography and architecture from 1848 to 1914. This is where you will see some masterpieces such as L’Olympia by Manet, La Petite Danseuse âgée de quatorze ans by Degas or L’origine du Monde by Courbet. This is also the place where you will find the major art movements of this period: the Pompous movement, the Impressionism, the Fauvists, the Nabis, the School of Pont-Aven, the Symbolism, Naturalism and of course the art nouveau with a considerable collection of ceramics, glassware, jewelry and furniture.

MUSEE D’ORSAY


1 rue de la Légion d’Honneur 75007 Paris
01.40.49.48.14
www.musee-orsay.fr

INSTITUT DU MONDE ARABE

 

Here is another magnificent building created by Jean Nouvel to accommodate an absolutely unique place in Europe dedicated to the Arab and Muslim culture. The Institut du Monde Arabe (Arab World Institute) is more than a simple museum, it is a lively place where we can breathe the air of the Eastern world. An exhibition, a look round the bookshop, a mint tea, a conference … we could almost stay there all day.

 

 

 

INSTITUT DU MONDE ARABE


11 rue des Fossés Saint-Bernard 75005 Paris
01.40.51.58.14
www.imarabe.org

MUSEE DELACROIX

This museum is situated in the apartment, in the studio and in the garden where Eugène Delacroix lived until his death in 1853. You will see some beautiful paintings such as the portrait of his faithful Jenny and the gorgeous Madeleine dans le desert that Beaudelaire adored.

MUSEE DELACROIX

6 place Furstenberg 75006 Paris

01.44.41.86.50

www.musee-delacroix.fr

MUSEE MAILLOL

When Aristide Maillol died, Dina Vierny, who was his Muse and his companion, decided to create a foundation. This foundation was inaugurated in 1995. The Musée Maillol gathers together a collection of drawings, engravings, paintings and sculptures of the artist, but also his personal collection in which we can find some works of art by Ingres, Cézanne, Matisse, Degas or Picasso.

The museum regularly organizes temporary exhibitions dedicated to antique and modern art, but also to contemporary art and to the major artists of the 20th century.

MUSEE MAILLOL

61 rue de Grenelle 75007 Paris

01.42.22.59.58

www.museemaillol.com

MUSEE DU QUAI BRANLY


The Quai Branly Museum or Museum of arts and civilizations in Africa, Asia, Oceania and America, devised and designed by Jean Nouvel, is made of four buildings which are linked together by footbridges.

This cultural place is set under the patronage of the UNESCO. Its ambition is to acknowledge the major place occupied by civilizations, sometimes kept on the sidelines of the present culture of the world. This museum gives people much to see and think about.

MUSEE DU QUAI BRANLY JACQUES CHIRAC

37 Quai Branly 75007 Paris

01 56 61 70 00

www.quaibranly.fr

FONDATION CARTIER

Established in 1984, the Fondation Cartier stands up for visual arts, cinema, photography and fashion. Since 1994 it has been located in a wonderful glass building designed by Jean Nouvel. The Fondation is a really lively place, thanks to the “Nomades” Evenings, regular appointments with the performing arts, but also with the work-groups for children or an initiation to contemporary art.

FONDATION CARTIER

264 Boulevard Raspail 75014 Paris

01.42.18.56.50

www.fondation.cartier.com

MUSEE DE CLUNY

 

The National Museum of the Middle Ages is settled down in two exceptional Parisian monuments: the Gallo-Roman thermae (1st and 2nd centuries) and the Hotel of the abbots of Cluny (end of the 15th century). The collections enable people to go through almost fifteen centuries of art and architecture : Romanesque architecture, Gothic sculpture, paintings, stained-glass windows, the famous tapestries of the Dame à la Licorne.

 

 

The medieval garden shows the different facets of the garden as it used to be during the Middle Ages, both wild and organized.

 

 

MUSEE DE CLUNY


6 Place Paul Painlevé 75005 Paris
01.53.73.78 00
www.musee-moyenage.fr

MUSEE BOURDELLE

The Musée Bourdelle is the studio where Antoine Bourdelle lived and worked for four years. The museum takes up the whole space: apartments, studio and garden. The place was turned into a museum in 1949. Then two expansions were made by Henri Gautruche in 1961 and by Christian de Portzamparc in 1992. More than 500 sculpted works of art are scattered over the rooms and the garden of the museum. But many temporary exhibitions of contemporary artists are also presented : Luciano Fabro, Felice Varini, Henry Moore, Alain Séchas …

MUSEE BOURDELLE

16-18 rue Antoine Bourdelle 75015 Paris

01 49 54 73 73