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BACKSIDE

Jean Paul Gaultier, Fall-Winter 2011-2012 Galliera, Musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris.

Le Palais Galliera présente Back Side, dos à la mode, une exposition hors les murs, consacrée au vêtement vu de dos, accueillie au musée Bourdelle.
Dans notre société obsédée par le visage, Back Side, dos à la mode est un sujet original et inattendu.

The Palais Galliera presents “Back Side / Fashion from Behind”, an off-site exhibition at the Musée Bourdelle which focuses on clothing seen from behind.In a society that is obsessed with people’s faces, “Back Side / Fashion from Behind” is an original and unexpected theme. By addressing our body’s relationship to clothing from a social and psychological point of view, the exhibition questions the perception we have of our own and other people’s backs.The back is a reminder of our limitations: it is hidden from view and to some extent from touch. Yet, fashion consistently decorates it, burdens it, or reveals it. On this flattest part of our body, messages and patterns are unambiguously displayed without our ever seeing the glances they attract.The back in fashion: from the majestic train of a court gown to the weight of a backpack; the sensuality of a plunging backline to complicated fastening systems. This exceptional exhibition of clothing and accessories from the collections of the Palais Galliera presents over a hundred items from the 18th century up to the present day. And to complete the exhibition, a selection of film extracts and photographs.The exhibition spreads across the Great Hall of Plasters, the contemporary Portzamparc extension and Antoine Bourdelle’s studio. The models on display establish a dialogue between fashion and sculpture, a dialogue with the works of this great master of the turn of the 20th century. “Back Side – Fashion from Behind” gives us a new take on the works of Bourdelle: we look with new eyes at the powerful, muscular backs and the slender outlines of his sculptures.

Jean Paul Gaultier, Fall Winter1995. Galliera, Musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris.

In a society that is obsessed with people’s faces, “Back Side / Fashion from Behind” is an original and unexpected theme. By addressing our body’s relationship to clothing from a social and psychological point of view, the exhibition questions the perception we have of our own and other people’s backs.

John Galliano, Fall Winter 1998-99 © Patrimoine John Galliano © Aurélie Dupuis/ Azentis

The back is a reminder of our limitations: it is hidden from view and to some extent from touch. Yet, fashion consistently decorates it, burdens it, or reveals it. On this flattest part of our body, messages and patterns are unambiguously displayed without our ever seeing the glances they attract.

Balenciaga, Robe du soir, Fall Winter 1961-62 © Balenciaga Archives Paris © Aurélie Dupuis/ Azentis

The back in fashion: from the majestic train of a court gown to the weight of a backpack; the sensuality of a plunging backline to complicated fastening systems. This exceptional exhibition of clothing and accessories from the collections of the Palais Galliera presents over a hundred items from the 18th century up to the present day. And to complete the exhibition, a selection of film extracts and photographs.

Jeanloup Sieff, Eve de dos, Kim Islinski, New York, 1997 © Estate of Jeanloup Sieff

The exhibition spreads across the Great Hall of Plasters, the contemporary Portzamparc extension and Antoine Bourdelle’s studio. The models on display establish a dialogue between fashion and sculpture, a dialogue with the works of this great master of the turn of the 20th century. “Back Side – Fashion from Behind” gives us a new take on the works of Bourdelle: we look with new eyes at the powerful, muscular backs and the slender outlines of his sculptures.

Antoine Bourdelle (1861-1929), Centaure mourant, 1914, © Aurélie Dupuis / Musée Bourdelle / Azentis

July 5 – November 19, 2019

MUSEE BOURDELLE

18, rue Antoine-Bourdelle 75015 Paris

01 49 54 73 73

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SALLY MANN

A Thousand Crossings

For more than forty years, Sally Mann (born 1951) has been taking hauntingly beautiful experimental photographs that explore the essential themes of existence: memory, desire, mortality, family, and nature’s overwhelming indifference towards mankind. What gives unity to this vast corpus of portraits, still lifes, landscapes and miscellaneous studies is that it is the product of one place, the southern United States.

Sally Mann was born in Lexington, Virginia. Many years ago she wrote about what it means to live in the South; drawing on a deep love for that area and a profound awareness of its complex historical heritage, she raised bold, thought-provoking questions – about history, identity, race and religion – that went beyond geographical and national boundaries.

This exhibition is the first major retrospective of the eminent artist’s work; it examines her relationship with her native region and how it has shaped her work. The retrospective is arranged in five parts and features many previously unknown or unpublished works. It is both an overview of four decades of the artist’s work and a thoughtful analysis of how the legacy of the South – at once, homeland and cemetery, refuge and battlefield – is reflected in her work as a powerful and disturbing force that continues to shape the identity and the reality of an entire country.

June 18 – September 22, 2019

JEU DE PAUME

1, place de la Concorde 75001 Paris

01 47 03 12 50


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BERTHE MORISOT


A leading Impressionist figure, Berthe Morisot remains to this day less well-known than her friends Monet, Degas and Renoir. Yet she was immediately recognised as one of the group’s most innovative artists.

The exhibition traces the exceptional career of a painter who, at odds with the practices on her time and her circle, became a key figure of the Parisian avant-garde movement in the late 1860s up until her untimely death in 1895.

Painting from a model allowed Berthe Morisot to explore several themes of modern life, such as the private life of the bourgeoisie, the popularity of holiday resorts and gardens, and the importance of fashion and women’s domestic work, while blurring the borders between the interior and exterior, the private and the public, the finished and the unfinished. It was her belief that painting should endeavour to “capture something that passes”.

Modern subjects and rapid execution are thus linked to the temporality of the representation, and the artist tirelessly tackled the ephemeral and the passing of time. Her last works, characterised by a new expressiveness and musicality, provoke an often melancholic meditation of these relationships between art and life.

June 18 – September 22, 2019

MUSEE D’ORSAY

1, rue de la Légion d’Honneur, 75007 Paris

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MARC PATAUT

Proximities

The exhibition by Marc Pataut (born in Paris in 1952) presents a corpus of around fifteen photographic series, some of which are being exhibited for the first time. The artist’s work explores the individual’s relationship both to themselves and to society. His pictures reveal faces, bodies, affiliations and life stories. Linked to specific sites and regions, his projects grow organically over long periods and are nourished by an accumulation of personal and collective experiences.

The exhibition features a selection of his photographic essays produced between 1981 and the present day. This is not a retrospective, however. Rather, it is an artistic proposition focused on his art works and the evolution over time of their political relationships to society, space and territory.
Frequently shaped by debates, exchanges and struggles, his work is a form of social and political thought. The works featured in the exhibition and the accompanying catalogue propose another relationship: that between the artworks and the public.

June 18 – September 22, 2019

JEU DE PAUME

1 Place de la Concorde 75001 Paris

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FRANZ HALS

Family Portraits


Frans Hals (1582/83-1666) is one of the greatest portrait painters of the Dutch Golden Age and, along with Rembrandt, responsible for revolutionising the genre. The artist is mostly famous for his individual portraits and his large compositions representing militia members, and his family portraits are not particularly well-known. Only four of them survive today, all included in the exhibition.

The exhibition was prompted by the acquisition by the Toledo Museum of Art in 2011 of Frans Hals’s Van Campen Family in a Landscape, as well as the recent conservation of Children of the Van Campen Family with a Goat Cart (now in the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium). These two works originally formed one composition, separated for unknown reasons likely in the early 19th century. The restoration work undertaken in Brussels also confirmed that a Head of a Young Boy, currently in a private collection in Europe, was also a fragment of the scattered painting. For the first time in two hundred years, the three surviving sections of the monumental family portrait, which must at the outset have measured nearly 3.80 metres long, are presented side by side on the occasion of this unique exhibition.

Frans Hals’s family portraits display a hitherto unprecedented degree of relaxation, demonstrating the intimacy of relations between parents and their children. The children interact joyfully amongst themselves. Smiles and laughter were Hals’s trademark; the artist’s genius is also illustrated in the other paintings in the exhibition: Family Group in a Landscape from the Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza (Madrid), the Dutch Family from the Cincinnati Art Museum and the Family Group in a Landscape from the National Gallery, London.

8 June to 25 August 2019

FONDATION CUSTODIA

121 rue De Lille 75007 Paris

01 47 05 75 19

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Childrens of the Golden Age

The exhibition includes drawings, prints and paintings, offering visitors a wide-ranging overview of the subject of the representation of children in seventeenth-century Holland and Flanders.

Individual portraits of children predominate: from the charming girl by Nicolaes Maes, to the iconic effigy of Hugo Grotius who, from the height of his sixteen years of age, already surveys the world with a serious gaze; from little Jenneken busy writing, drawn in red chalk by her brother Harmen ter Borch, to the delightful portrait that Hendrick Goltzius engraved of the son of one of his best friends. These last three portraits represent children who can be identified by the inscriptions they bear; other depictions however – like the one painted by Nicolaes Maes – contain no identification of the model.

Artists often portrayed children while they are sleeping. Sleep is a state that occurs regularly with all children, and it is no surprise to see Frans van Mieris’ drawing of Willem Paets, the son of one of his friends, asleep in his cradle. In the drawing by Govert Flinck, one of Rembrandt’s best students, we have a magnificent study, almost certainly drawn from life, of a sleeping boy. Here, the innocence and vulnerability of childhood are strikingly represented.Rembrandt also frequently drew and etched children, often as they interacted with women (mothers, grandmothers, nurses), or with the features of the young apprentices in his workshop.

In addition to these well-known sheets, the exhibition also contains a large number of items from the Fondation Custodia’s collection which have never been shown before, as well as some recent acquisitions. The way Dutch and Flemish artists of the 17th century looked at children and childhood offers today’s viewer both a glimpse into a bygone era and a mirror for our own perceptions on the first years of life.

June 8 – August 25, 2019

FONDATION CUSTODIA

121 rue de Lille 75007 Paris

01 47 05 75 19

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TREES

Underestimated by biology for a long time, trees—like the entirety of the plant kingdom—have been the subject of scientific discoveries in recent years that have allowed us to see the oldest members of our community of living beings in a new light. Boasting sensory and memory capacities, as well as communication skills, existing in symbiosis with other species and exerting a climatic influence, trees are equipped with unexpected faculties whose discovery has given way to the fascinating hypothesis of “plant intelligence,” which could be the answer to many of today’s environmental problems. In resonance with this “plant revolution,” the exhibition Trees merges the ideas of artists and researchers, thus prolonging the exploration of ecological issues and the question of humans’ relationship to nature, which has been a regular theme in the Fondation Cartier’s exhibition program, as was the case recently with The Great Animal Orchestra (2016). The garden of the Fondation Cartier, a natural extension of the exhibition, was created in 1994 by artist Lothar Baumgarten. The public are invited to stroll through the trees which, like the majestic Lebanese cedar planted by Chateaubriand in 1823, inspired Jean Nouvel to create an architecture of reflections and transparency, playing on the dialogue between inside and outside, and giving rise to “fleeting emotions.” Nestled in the vegetation, a discreet double of nature, retaining the trace of the artist’s hand on its trunk, Giuseppe Penone’s bronze tree sculpture finds its place in the garden of the Fondation Cartier. Also on display is a sculpture by Agnès Varda, specially imagined for this project. Finally, for a week in the fall, the Theatrum Botanicum will become the natural support of a video installation by Tony Oursler. The exhibition Trees restores the tree to the place from which it had been stripped by anthropocentrism. It brings together the testimonies, both artistic and scientific, of those capable of looking at the vegetal world with wonder and who show us, to quote philosopher Emanuele Coccia: “There is nothing purely human, the vegetal exists in all that is human, and the tree is at the origin of all experience.”

Featuring drawings, paintings, photographs, films, and installations by artists from Latin America, Europe, the United States, Iran, and from indigenous communities such as the Nivaclé and Guaraní from Gran Chaco, Paraguay, as well as the Yanomami Indians who live in the heart of the Amazonian forest, the exhibit, punctuated by several large ensembles, explores three narrative threads. Firstly, our knowledge of trees—from botany to new plant biology—; secondly, aesthetics—from naturalistic contemplation to dreamlike transposition—; and lastly, trees’ current devastation recounted via documentary observations and pictorial testimonies.

Orchestrated with anthropologist Bruce Albert, who has accompanied the Fondation Cartier’s inquisitive exploration of such themes since the exhibition Yanomami, Spirit of the Forest (2003), the project revolves around a number of individuals who have developed a unique relationship with trees, whether intellectual, scientific or aesthetic. For example, the botanist Stefano Mancuso, a pioneer of plant neurobiology and advocate of the concept of plant intelligence, has collaborated with Thijs Biersteker to create an installation that “gives voice” to trees, and through a series of sensors, reveals their reaction to the environment and pollution, as well as the phenomenon of photosynthesis, root communication, and the idea of plant memory, thus making the invisible visible. Another of the great figures who has played a role in constructing the exhibition is traveling botanist Francis Hallé, whose notebooks display both the artist’s wonder at trees and the precision of an in-depth knowledge of plants. His work is a testimony of the encounter between science and sensibility. At the heart of the exhibition lies a reflection on the relationship between humans and trees, which is also the subject of Raymond Depardon’s film. It paints the portrait of the plane trees and oaks that shade village squares through the words of those who are familiar with them, and to which many memories, ranging from the highly personal to the historical, are connected. Artist and sower, Fabrice Hyberhas planted some 300,000 tree seeds in his valley in Vendée, and offers a poetic and personal observation of the plant world in his paintings, questioning the principles of rhizome growth, energy and mutation, mobility and metamorphosis. Guided more by the aesthetics of an intuitive collection than by a search for scientific rigor, Brazilian artist Luiz Zerbini, on the other hand, composes lush landscapes, organizing the imaginary meeting of trees, borrowed from tropical botanical gardens, and the markers of urban modernity. To this pictorial exuberance responds the conceptual and systematic inventory elaborated by architect Cesare Leonardi, in collaboration with Franca Stagi: a typology of trees, their shades and chromatic variations, in a precious corpus compiled for the purposes of the design of urban parks. The ghostly silhouettes of Johanna Calle’s tall trees evoke with poetry and delicacy, the fragility of these giants threatened by irreversible deforestation. The drama of the destruction of the world’s great forests, conveyed in particular by the film EXIT by architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro, comes after the dreamlike world of Paraguayan film-maker Paz Encina who offers an internalized image of the tree as a refuge for memory and childhood.

The garden of the Fondation Cartier, a natural extension of the exhibition, was created in 1994 by artist Lothar Baumgarten. The public are invited to stroll through the trees which, like the majestic Lebanese cedar planted by Chateaubriand in 1823, inspired Jean Nouvel to create an architecture of reflections and transparency, playing on the dialogue between inside and outside, and giving rise to “fleeting emotions.”

Nestled in the vegetation, a discreet double of nature, retaining the trace of the artist’s hand on its trunk, Giuseppe Penone’s bronze tree sculpture finds its place in the garden of the Fondation Cartier. Also on display is a sculpture by Agnès Varda, specially imagined for this project. Finally, for a week in the fall, the Theatrum Botanicum will become the natural support of a video installation by Tony Oursler.

The exhibition Trees restores the tree to the place from which it had been stripped by anthropocentrism. It brings together the testimonies, both artistic and scientific, of those capable of looking at the vegetal world with wonder and who show us, to quote philosopher Emanuele Coccia: “There is nothing purely human, the vegetal exists in all that is human, and the tree is at the origin of all experience.”

July 12 – November 10, 2019

FONDATION CARTIER

261 Boulevaed Raspail 75014 Paris


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Italian Drawings from the Mariette Collection

Pierre Jean Mariette (1694–1774) brought together one of the most fascinating collections in the whole of the 18th century, particularly showcasing drawings, with some 9,600 sheets. Masterpieces by great artists stood alongside pieces of bravura by minor masters, in line with the encyclopedic commitment of this “genius jack-of-all-trades” in his effort to perfectly summarize the history of drawing, from its origins through contemporary artists.

Following on from Pierre Rosenberg’s 2011 publication of the first two volumes devoted to French drawings from the Mariette Collection, the publication of a comprehensive annotated catalogue of Italian drawings likewise accompanies this exhibition of some one hundred of the most remarkable Mariette sheets from this school: works by the greatest Italian artists, including Raphael, Michelangelo, Titian, Veronese, Carracci, Guido Reni, and Guercino, have been taken from several Parisian collections, first and foremost that of the Musée du Louvre.   

The last representative of an illustrious dynasty of print dealers, admitted as a “free associate” to the Académie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture, Pierre Jean Mariette was a printer and draughtsman, translator and art critic, tireless letter writer, and above all, one of the greatest drawing collectors of all time.   While Mariette sought to create a universal collection, he had a clear preference for Italy, as illustrated by a letter dated December 12, 1769, to the architect Tommaso Temanza: “Those who, like me, give preference to the works of the Italian masters over those of the painters produced by the Netherlands, are few and far between (…). This does not prevent me from pursuing my tastes, and it is no exaggeration to tell you that my collection, created in this spirit, is perhaps the most complete and well selected that exists in Europe.”   The portion of the collection that provided its author with the greatest pleasure and sense of pride is thus featured by the Louvre in this exhibition. Following a brief overview of Pierre Jean Mariette and the legendary nature of his collection, visitors are invited to follow in the footsteps of his journey in Italy, undertaken at the age of 23, and which was, for him, an extraordinary “school of seeing”. The Mariette Collection is akin to a journey in space (through artistic centers) and time (from the beginnings of drawing through contemporary artists), from Venice to Tuscany, Bologna, Rome, and Naples.   

The final section highlights the mounts so specific to his drawings. One of the collection’s distinguishing elements, these mounts encompassed a band that was generally white, a gold band, and the famous blue paper adorned with shaded black bands, each sheet featuring a unique cartouche containing the artist’s name. It concludes with the history of the collection’s dispersal and reconstitution, which is still ongoing today. 

June 24 – September 30, 2019

MUSEE du LOUVRE